Hearing in the Military Software Syrinx vibration dynamics Effect of air cavities in avian hearing X-ray recordings of singing birds Psychoacoustic testing 3D reconstruction of songbird syrinx Magnetic oriantation
[CV]

Curriculum Vitae

Kenneth K. Jensen, Ph.D.

(Download CV as pdf)

Work contact information:
Audiology and Speech Center, America Building
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
8901 Wisconsin Ave
Bethesda, MD 20889
Phone: (301) 319-7054
e-mail: kenneth.k.jensen.ctr@us.army.mil

Private contact information:
11401 July Drive, Apt. 301
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Phone: (317) 748-2725
e-mail: kkj@jensenkk.net

Education

Audiology, Post Doc                                                                                      
November 2010 – Present
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD /
(before August 2011: Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC)

Neuroscience of Vocal Communication, Post Doc                       
March 2007 – October 2010
Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana                     

Neuroscience of Vocal Communication, Ph.D.                                
February 2001 – July 2005
University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Animal orientation and Navigation, M.Sc.                                         
August 1996 – May 2000
University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Acoustic Communication, B.Sc.                                                          
August 1993 – June 1996
University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark


PUBLICATIONS

Jensen, K. K. & Klokker, S. (2006) Hearing sensitivity and critical ratios of hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix). Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 119 (2) 1269 - 1276.

Jensen, K. K. (2007) Co-modulation detection differences in the hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix), with direct comparison to human subjects. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 121 (3) 1783 - 1789.

Jensen, K. K., Cooper, B. G., Larsen, O. N., & Goller, F. (2007) Songbirds use pulse tone register in two voices to generate low-frequency sound. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 274 (1626) 2703 - 2710.

Jensen, K. K., Larsen, O. N., & Attenborough, K. (2008) Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123 (1) 507 - 518

Jensen, K. K. (2010) Light-dependent orientation responses in animals can be explained by a model of compass cue integration. Journal of Theoretical Biology. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2009.09.005.

Conference talks

Invited talk: Jensen, K. K. (2012) A model of multimodal compass-cue integration to explain complex orientation responses to monochromatic light. IVth European Conference on Behavioural Biology, Essen, Germany, July 19-22.

Jensen, K. K., Bernstein, J. G. W. (2012) Modeling speech perception in competing speech and speech. Talk given at the American Auditory Society Annual Meeting March 8-10, 2012 Scottsdale, Arizona, USA

Poster Abstracts

Jensen, K. K., Christensen-Dalsgaard, C., Suthers, R. A., & Larsen, O. N. (2010) A newly discovered superoantero-orbital sinus connecting to the interaural canal may play a role in zebra finch hearing. 9th International Congress of Neuroethology, Salamanca, Spain, August 2nd - August 7th.

Riede, T., Jensen, K. K., Larsen, O. N., Attenborough, K., & Shahram, T. (2010) Habitat acoustics of Rocky Mountain elk in Colorado and European Red deed in Denmark. The 90th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mammalogists, Laramie, USA, June 11th - June 15th.

Riede, T., Jensen, K. K., Larsen, O. N., Attenborough, K., & Shahram, T. (2010) Habitat acoustics of Rocky Mountain elk in Colorado and European Red deed in Denmark. Rocky Mountain National Park 2010 Research Conference, Estes park, Colorado, USA. March 30th - March 31st.

Jensen, K. K. & Suthers, R. A. (2008) Real-time compensation for formant changes by beak gape in a songbird. Acoustic Communication by Animals, Corvallis, Oregon, USA.

Jensen, K. K., Zollinger, S., Childress, S., Larsen, O. N., & Suthers, R. A. (2008) Anatomy and vibratory dynamics in the songbird syrinx. Acoustic Communication by Animals, Corvallis, Oregon, USA.

Jensen, K. K., Larsen, O. N. & Attenborough, K. (2007) Modeling and measuring sound propagation of hooded crow calls in open field habitats. International Ethology Conference, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Larsen ON, Jensen K. K. and Goller F (2006): Pulse register phonation in crows revealed with high-speed video endoscopy. Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, Tokyo, Japan p. 127-128.

Jensen, K. K. & Klokker, S. (2004) Hearing threshold and critical ratios in hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix). 7th congress of the international society for neuroethology (ICN), Nyborg, Denmark.

Larsen, O. N., Jensen, K. K., & Goller, F. (2004) High-speed video recording of labial movement during bird phonation. 7th congress of the international society for neuroethology (ICN), Nyborg, Denmark.

Jensen, K. K. (2000) Redstarts (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) seem able to orient by the magnetic field under red light. 28th Göttingen Neurobiology Conference, Göttingen, Germany.

TEACHING

Fall 2006
Biology from Molecule to Ecosystem (BB501) – Instructor (lab practical). First year undergraduates. Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Fall 2005
Hearing and Sound Perception in Humans (BB78)– Instructor (lectures, practicals, projects, making a 3 hour written exam). An advanced course for engineering and biology graduate students. Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Fall 2005
The Changing Nature (FY501)Instructor (crating syllabus, compendium, creating and running lab practicals, creating theoretical projects, and giving lectures). An undergraduate general science course with 230 enrolled students. Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Spring 2005
Animal Behavior A (BB42A) – Instructor (lectures). Graduate level course. Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

2001-2004
General Physiology A (BB16) – Teaching assistant (lab practicals)
Animal Behavior (BB42A)Teaching assistant (lab practicals)
Biology A (BB08) – Teaching assistant (lab practicals & discussions)
Graduate and undergraduate courses. Teaching a total of 240 classroom hours as an integrate part of my Ph.D. education. Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Fall 1997
Animal Behavior (BB42A) – Teaching assistant (lab practicals), Department of biology, University of Southern Denmark.

Graduate student co-supervision

2003 - 2004
Klokker, S. (2006) Psycho-acoustic determination of audibility curves and critical ratios in crows (Corvus corone cornix) and humans with issues on signal detection theory. MS Thesis, Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

2005 - 2006
Bendixen, K. H. (2006) The influence of anthropogenic noise on the acoustic communication of certain birds. MS Thesis, Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Graduate student examination

Spring 2005
Examiner at oral exam of an undergrad project report: Noer, C. L., Nielsen, R. L., & Pedersen, S. D. (2005) Open Door Tests in growing pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus): Examining how different housing-variables influences behavioral responding. 6 ECTS. Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Fall 2005
Examiner and written exam designer in the graduate student course Hearing and Sound Perception in Humans (BB78).Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

GRANTS

Competitive research grant (2009) awarded by a foundation belonging to the hearing aid company Oticon, Smørum, Denmark.

Competitive research grant (2007) awarded by the Carlsberg Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

Speech perception by human listeners     

November 2010 – Present
Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, MD, USA

Modeling of speech perception in fluctuating maskers: Research in why speech intelligibility index models specifically fail to predict speech intelligibility in speech related maskers like interfering talkers or speech envelope modulated noise. Psychoacoustic tests on normal hearing listeners on the possible effect of the dynamic range of speech and modulation rate.
Implementing modifications to speech intelligibility models: Based on the above we are working on implementing a modification of speech intelligibility models by incorporating a factor that takes into account a “picket fence” effect where speech intelligibility at slow masker modulation rates depends on the probability of detecting a snippet of all phonemes of target words.

Research in hearing and vocal communication

March 2007 – October 2010
School of Medicine, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA

Auditory feedback: Research in the control of vocal formants (analogue to human speech formants) by auditory feedback in a songbird. Performed x-ray cinematography and video movement analysis. Results showed songbirds control formants actively by auditory feedback and responded in a similar way to humans.
Directional hearing: Discovery of a hollow structure that interconnects to the inter-aural canal in birds that is likely to facilitate directional hearing. Laser vibrometry measurements of acoustic effect. MRI scanning for 3D reconstruction of structures.
Vocal production: X-ray cinematographical research into the use of oral cavities in sound modulation during vocal production. Research into the specific anatomy and oscillation dynamics of sound producing labia in songbirds analogous to human vocal folds.

Directional Hearing, Post Doc

2009 – December 2009 (Grant awarded by Oticon)
Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, &                                                    
University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Discovery of an air filled cavity in the skull of birds connected to the inner ear which may play an important role in directional hearing. Experiments involve 3D reconstruction of inter-aural cavities. Acoustic systems modeling in collaboration with professor in physics Neville Fletcher, University of New England, Canberra, Australia. Laser vibrometry measurements of eardrum vibrations. Histology.

Computational Neuroscience, Animal Navigation and Orientation 

2007 – 2010
Independent research

Formulation of theoretical and computational model of neural integration to explain the hot research topic of the mysterious and intriguing effect of light on the magnetic sense of navigating animals. Well-received and complimented by significant peers: “This is the most creative piece of work I've seen in a while, and gives the animal navigation community a new way of thinking about a thorny problem...has great explanatory power... Frankly, I wish I had come up with the idea!” [Anonymous reviewer]; “… a new and really very useful model to possibly understand bird magnetic orientation… a clever idea that should be followed up…” [Professor Almut Kelber]; “…fascinating and highly provocative paper!...” [Professor Uwe Homberg]; “…an interesting and thought provoking contribution to the debate concerning the mechanism(s) of magnetoreception in higher animal…” [Professor John Philips].

Comparative psychoacoustics    

October 2003 – November 2003
Psychology Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

Collaboration with renowned Professor Robert Dooling  conducting research into a potential effect of lowering hearing thresholds of speech-like harmonic complexes by amplitude (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). Conducted on zebra finches which are important animal models in comparative research of human hearing, speech, and vocal learning.

Acoustic Communication

February 2004 – July 2005
Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Psychoacoustic research: Engineered a psychoacoustic test system from scratch for comparative tests of hearing in crows and humans. Programmed DSP equipment (Tucker Davis) for stimuli generation and control, and programmed custom software (Delphi/Object Pascal) to run the sessions and collect data automatically. Required study and implementation of Signal Detection Theory.
Vocal production: Angiocopic high-speed filming of sound production mechanism in vocal organ of crows (similar to human speech production). Contributed significantly to development of experimental technique for high speed recording by proving laser light through optic fibers and video enhancement.
Vocal signal propagation: Modeling of crow call propagation and hearing in the natural noisy environment. Combined engineer sound propagation modeling with hearing and vocal production research.
Acoustic brain stem responses (ABR): testing of crow hearing with ABR technique in collaboration with Dr. Beth Brittan-Powell, University of Maryland, MD, USA.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

Dr. Joshua G. W. Bernstein,Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889, USA (joshua.bernstein@med.navy.mil).

Prof. Roderick A. Suthers, Indiana University, School of Medicine, Jordan Hall, 1001 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA (suthers@indiana.edu).

Prof. Robert J. Dooling, Laboratory of Comparative Psychoacoustics, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. (dooling@psyc.umd.edu).

Dr. Ole Næsbye Larsen, Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark. (onl@biology.sdu.dk).